Volume of Triangular Prism, Cylinder and Sphere (Primary 6)

Last Updated on July 16, 2020 by Alabi M. S.

 

MATHEMATICS

SECOND TERM  

WEEK 6

PRIMARY 6

THEME – MEASUREMENT 

PREVIOUS LESSON – Second Term Scheme of Work and Plan Lesson Notes for MATHEMATICS Week 1 to Week 12 Primary Schools

TOPIC – VOLUME OF CYLINDER, PRISM AND. SPHERE 

LEARNING AREA

1. Volume of Cylinders

2. Volume of Prisms

3. Volume of Spheres

 

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES 

By the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following objectives (cognitive, affective and psychomotor) and should be able to –

1. calculate volume of prisms, cylinders and spheres.

2. solve some quantitative aptitude problem on volume of prism, cylinder and sphere.

 

ENTRY BEHAVIOUR

Tin of milk, orange, etc.

 

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

The teacher will teach the lesson with the aid of Balls, cylindrical tins, triangular prisms.

 

 

METHOD OF TEACHING – Choose a suitable and appropriate methods for the lessons.

Note – Irrespective of choosing methods of teaching, always introduce an activities that will arouse pupil’s interest or lead them to the lessons. 

 

REFERENCE MATERIALS

1. Scheme of Work

2. 9 – Years Basic Education Curriculum

3. Course Book

4. All Relevant Material

5. Online Information

 

CONTENT OF THE LESSON  

 

LESSON ONE – VOLUME OF TRIANGULAR PRISMS 

 

Pupil’s Activities 1 – Introduction to Triangular Prism (5 minutes) 

Draw and indicate the characteristics of cuboid,

 

Properties of Cuboid,

1. 8 vertices (corners)

2. 13 edges

3. 6 flat faces (2 squares and 4 rectangular faces)

4. Length, Breadth and Height

 

Teacher’s remark – A cuboid is a box – shaped object. It is also a prism because it has the same cross – section along a length. In fact, it is a rectangular prism. The volume of Cuboid is Volume = Length x Breadth x Height. Measure in cm³ or m³. 

 

 

 

Teacher’s/Pupil’s Activities 2 – Volumes of Cuboid (5 minutes) 

Find the volume of,

 

 

Volume of Cuboid, 

= Length x Breadth x Height

= 4 m x 5 m x 10 m

= 100 m³

 

Pupil’s Activities 3 – Rectangular and Triangular Prism (10 minutes) 

Discussion and demonstration of triangular prism from rectangular prism.

 

Different between Rectangular and Triangular Prism,

Rectangular prism                      Triangular Prism

1. 6 flat faces                               5 flat faces

2. 8 vertices (corners)                6 vertices (corners)

3. 12 edges (lengths)                 9 edges (lengths)

 

Teacher’s/Pupil’s Activities 4 – Volume of Triangular Prism (10 minutes) 

Leads pupils to identify the Volume of Triangular Prism as half (½) of the Volume of Rectangular Prism.

That’s, if the Volume of Triangular Prism is 100 m²… Then, Volume of Triangular Prism will be 50 m².

 

 

Volume of Triangular Prism = ½ x Length x Breadth x Height 

V = ½ x L x B x H or V = ½ l b h

 

 

 Teacher’s/Pupil’s Activities 5 – Life Application of Triangular Prism (3 minutes) 

 

 

Pupil’s Activities 6 – Exercises/Take Home (7 minutes) 

Find the volume of these triangular prisms,

 

 

LESSON TWO – VOLUME OF CYLINDER 

 

Pupil’s Activities 1 – Identification of Objects of Cylinders (5 minutes) 

Identify the following objects on the chart,

Expected Response

1. Peak milk

2. Corn beef

3. Energy drink

4. Tin tomatoes

 

Mention 5 objects in cylinder form,

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

 

Teacher’s remark – The following objects are known as cylinder. 

 

Pupil’s Activities 2 – Description of Objects of Cylinder and Arrange the Tins According to their Height (5 minutes) 

Expected Response – The tin has two round top and button with long round side.

From the short height,

1. Gino and corn beef, almost the same height.

2. Peak milk

3. Energy drink

 

 

Teacher’s remark – A cylinder is a 3 – dimensional shape that circular top and button. The side is the amount of space it has inside. This is called volume. The side is known as the height, h. 

 

Teacher’s/Group’s Activities 3 – Identification of Radius of A Cylinder (5 minutes) 

Teacher’s Instructions

1. Gives each group a cut circular cardboard.

2. Fold the circle into two equal parts.

3. Examine each part and describe.

4. Further fold into four equal part.

5. Describe each part.

 

Teacher’s activities – Observe and Listen to the group while carrying out your instructions. 

 

Teacher’s remark based on pupil’s responses – The circle fold into two equal formed a line called diameter – the line that divide the circle into two equal parts. When you further folded into four equal parts, it formed four lines. Each line is half of diameter called radius. Now, Cylinder has many radius. 

 

Expected response – 2 radius (radii)

 

 

Pupil’s Activities 3 – Volume of A Cylinder and Application (10 minutes) 

Teacher’s comments,

The Volume (Area) of a Cylinder is written as Volume (V) = π r²h

That’s, π x r x r x h

Where, π = 22/7.

1. Find the volume

 

 

Volume = π r²h where, π = 22/7, r = 14 cm and h = 18 cm

= 22/7 ¹ x 14 ² cm x 14 cm x 18 cm

= 22 x 2 cm x 14 cm x 18 cm

= 11, 088 cm³

 

  1. A cylindrical tin of milk has its base diameter as 14 cm and height as 10 cm. Calculate the volume of tomato puree that can be contained in it (Take π = 22/7).

Volume = π r²h where, π = 22/7, r = 14/2 = 7 cm and h = 10 cm.

V = 22/7 ¹ x 7 ¹ cm x 7 cm x 10 cm.

= 22 x 1 cm x 7 cm x 10 cm

= 1, 540 cm².

 

Pupil’s Activities 4 – Exercises/Take Home (15 minutes) 

  1. Find the volume,

 

  1. A cylindrical paint bucket of diameter 10 cm is 14 cm high. Calculate its volume.

 

 

LESSON THREE VOLUME OF A SPHERE 

 

Pupil’s Activities 1 – Identification of Sphere Objects (5 minutes) 

1. Orange

2. Earth

3. Tennis ball

4. Football

 

Teacher’s remark – The following objects are known as sphere. We refer to objects like balls, oranges and globes as spheres.

 

Teacher’s/Pupil’s Activities 2 – Volume of Sphere and Applications (10 minutes) 

Teacher’s comments,

The Volume (V) of Sphere is written as 4/3 π r³. Where π = 22/7

That’s, V = 4/3 x 22/7 x r x r x r

 

Working Example

A solid sphere has a radius of 2 cm. Find the volume. Take π = 22/7

V = 4/3 π r³

= 4/3 x 22/7 x 2 cm x 2 cm x 2 cm

= 88/21 x 8 cm³

= 704/21 cm³

= 35.5 cm³.

 

 

Pupil’s Activities 3 – Exercises/Take Home 

Calculate the volume of each of these spheres.

1. Radius 6 cm

2. Radius 3 cm

3. Radius 5 cm

4. Radius 7 cm

5. Diameter 12 cm

6. Diameter 16 cm

 

LESSON FOUR – MAKING TRIANGULAR PRISM AND CYLINDER 

 

 

PRESENTATION

To deliver the lesson, the teacher adopts the following steps:

1. To introduce the lesson, the teacher revises the previous lesson. Based on this, he/she asks the pupils some questions;

2. Guides pupils to calculate volumes of prism, cylinders and spheres.

Pupil’s Activities – Calculate volumes of prism, cylinders and spheres.

3. Guides pupils to solve some quantitative aptitude problem on volume of prism, cylinder and spheres.

Pupil’s Activities – Solve quantitative aptitude problems on volume.

 

CONCLUSION

To conclude the lesson for the week, the teacher revises the entire lesson and links it to the following week’s lesson.

 

LESSON EVALUATION 

Pupils to calculate volumes if given triangular prism, cylinders and spheres.