Improving Crops Yield – Food and Cash Crops – Population and Economic Consequences (Primary 6)

Last Updated on August 26, 2020 by Alabi M. S.

 

 

BASIC SCIENCE 

BASIC SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

FIRST TERM

WEEK 9

PRIMARY 6

THEME: IMPROVING CROPS YIELD 

PREVIOUS LESSON – 

 

TOPIC: IMPROVING CROPS YIELD – POPULATION AND ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES 

A family is a group of people who are closely related to each other, such as a mother, a father, and their children. This set up is called nuclear family. In Africa, other relatives like Uncle, Nephew, Niece, Aunt, etc. live with the nuclear family in the same house. This is called extended family.

 

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

By the end of the lesson, the pupils should have attained the following objectives (cognitive, affective and psychomotor) and be able to:

1. explain how family size affects the demand for more crops;

2. discuss how family labour size affects food (crop) production;

3. mention examples of storage facilities for preserving crops yield.

 

ENTRY BEHAVIOR

The pupils are required to already have learned growing of crops.

 

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

The teacher will teach the lesson with the aid of:

Food crops

Cash crops

Charts

Posters and pictures of harvesters, storage facilities (e.g. silos, barns) and transport facilities.

 

 

METHOD OF TEACHING – Choose a suitable and appropriate methods for the lessons.

Note – Irrespective of choosing methods of teaching, always introduce an activities that will arouse pupil’s interest or lead them to the lessons. 

 

REFERENCE MATERIALS

Scheme of Work

9 – Years Basic Education Curriculum

MacMillan Basic Science and Technology Book 6

Foundation of Basic Science and Technology Book 6

All Relevant Materials

Online Information – Improving Crop Yield – Food and Cash Crops – Population and Economic Consequences – ASEI PDSI METHOD (Primary 6)

 

Related posts – improving Crops yield – growing of crops. Scheme of Work – first termsecond termthird term

 

 

CONTENT OF THE LESSON

LESSON ONE – INTRODUCTION 

A family is a group of people who are closely related to each other, such as a mother, a father, and their children.

This set up is called nuclear family.

In Africa, other relatives like Uncle, Nephew, Niece, Aunt, etc. live with the nuclear family in the same house.

This is called extended family.

 

POPULATION AND ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES ON CROPS PRODUCTION 

Family needs for food and cash crops is as a result of the size of the family.

Large family size also means large amount of food to feed the members. A small family size requires small amount of food but they produce less.

 

FOOD CROPS

Food crops are grown for food only (i.e. substances agriculture).

Examples of such food crops are yam, cassava, maize, millet, banana, plantain, rice, etc. These are grown by family members for food production. Food crop farms are not usually far from villages.

 


CASH CROPS

Cash crops are grown for both food and sale (i.e. commercial agriculture).

Examples of cash crops are cocoa, Kolanuts, rubber, palm oil, cotton, etc. They are done on a large scale so that they can be sold in markets, especially to those who do not engage in farming.

 

LESSON TWO – METHODS OF IMPROVING CROPS YIELD

Different ways of improving crops yield:

1. The use of fertilizer and manure.

2. Using improved seeds of crops and breeds of animals.

3. Practicing modern method of farming.

4. Co-operative society.

5. Educating the farmers.

 

EFFECTS OF FAMILY SIZE ON CROP PRODUCTION

The increase in number of people living together as a family (including other relatives) affect the amount of food needed by the family and amount of crop that can be produced to provide food for the family.

 

LESSON THREE – REASONS FOR IMPROVING CROP YIELD

The total quantity of a crop (food) produced from the farm at a particular time is called the farm yield or output.

It is important to increase the yield of crops because of the following reasons:

1. More food will be needed for the fast growing population;

2. It will increase the family income;

3. It prevents the problem of malnutrition and ill-health;

4. It will increase food reserve of the country;

5. It will give more income to the government through exportation;

It will improve the general well-being of the people.

 

 

STORAGE OF FARM PRODUCE 

1. Refrigerator or deep freezer

2. Canning or bottling

3. Bagging

4. Storehouse

5. In the soil, for example – yam.

 

PRESENTATION

To deliver the lesson, the teacher adopts the following steps:

To introduce the lesson, the teacher revises the previous lesson. Based on this, he/she asks the pupils some questions;

1. Initiates and guides class discussion on the importance of increased labour on crop yield;

Pupil’s Activities – Participate in class discussion.

2. Plans and leads to visit a food and cash crop farms;

Pupil’s Activities – List foods and cash crop grown by family members;

3. Teacher’s/Pupil’s Activities – Visit foods and cash crop farms.

 

CONCLUSION

  • To conclude the lesson for the week, the teacher revises the entire lesson and links it to the following week’s lesson – the human circulation system.
  • Next Lesson –


LESSON EVALUATION/ASSIGNMENT 

Pupils to:

1. explain three effects of family size on crop demand;

2. Different between cash and food crops.

3. discuss how family labour size affects crop production in the locality.

4. Mention 5 examples storage facilities for preserving crops yield.