Comparing and Ordering of Whole Numbers Up to 100 000 | Weekly Assessment Questions Primary 4 (Basic 4) – Mathematics

 

MATHEMATICS

FIRST TERM

WEEK 3

PRIMARY 5

THEME: WHOLE NUMBERS 

PREVIOUS LESSON – Whole Numbers – Counting, Reading and Writing up to One Million in ones, Tens Hundreds and Thousands  Primary 4 (Basic 4) – Mathematics

 

TOPIC – WHOLE NUMBERS

 

LEARNING AREA

1. Introductory Activities

2. Ordering of Whole Numbers Up to 100 000

3. Comparing Whole Numbers Up to 100 000

4. Lesson Evaluation and Weekly Assessment (Test)

 

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

By the end of the lesson, most of the pupils should have attained the following objectives –

1. order whole numbers up to 100 000 using the symbols “<” and “>”.

2. solve problems on quantitative reasoning involving ordering of whole numbers.

 

ENTRY BEHAVIOR

The pupils can read and write whole numbers up to 999 999.

 

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

The teacher will teach the lesson with the aid of abacus and charts of whole numbers, etc.

 

METHOD OF TEACHING

Choose a suitable and appropriate methods for the lessons.

Note – Irrespective of choosing methods of teaching, always introduce an activities that will arouse pupil’s interest or lead them to the lessons.

 

REFERENCE MATERIALS

Scheme of Work

9 – Years Basic Education Curriculum

Course Book – New Method Mathematics, Prime Mathematics, Primary Mathematics and MacMillan New Primary Mathematics

All Relevant Material

Online Information – Counting, Writing and Place Value up to 10 000 – 100 000 Primary 4 (Basic 4) – Term 1 Mathematics

 

 

CONTENT OF THE LESSON

LESSON 1 – ORDERING OF WHOLE NUMBERS

ACTIVITY 1 – INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITIES 

Ask pupils to arrange the following numbers from smallest to the largest.

1. 1, 0, 8, 5, 9, 6, 4, 3, 7, 2

2. 11, 10, 18, 15, 16, 14, 13, 17, 12

 

Teacher’s remark – When you rearrange numbers, starting from the smallest or largest, it is called ORDERING WHOLE NUMBERS.

Ordering whole numbers is a process of rearranging whole numbers in ascending order (from smallest to largest) or descending (from largest to smallest).

 

ACTIVITY 2 – ORDERING OF WHOLE NUMBERS UP 1 000

Guide pupils to arrange whole numbers from ascending or descending orders by following the simple steps.

 

For example, 

Arrange these numbers – 816, 842, 897, 893 in ascending or describing order.

 

Step 1 – Write all the numbers in expanded form. 

1st – 816 = 800 + 10 + 6

2nd 824 = 800 + 20 + 4

3rd 897 = 800 + 90 + 7

4th 893 – 800 + 90 + 3

 

Step 2 – Compare each number starting from the left to the right. 

1st – 816 = 800 + 10 + 6

2nd – 824 = 800 + 20 + 4

3rd – 897 = 800 + 90 + 7

4th – 893 – 800 + 90 + 3

 

Note, the second digit in the 1st and 2nd numbers are different and less than in 3rd and 4th number.

Therefore, since 20 is greater that 10,

The smallest number is 816, 820.

 

Step 3 – Third digit of 3rd and 4th are similar, cross and compare the large digits.

1st – 816 = 800 + 10 + 6

2nd – 824 = 800 + 20 + 4

3rd – 897 = 800 + 90 + 7

4th – 893 – 800 + 90 + 3

 

The last digit of the 3rd number is greater than the 4th number, therefore,

The ascending number is 816, 820, 893 and 897.

 

Note the following:

  • The number of digits will determine the smallest or largest number. For example, 2 digits number is less than 3 digits number, etc.
  • If the number of digits are same and also the first digit of each number, follow the procedure in example 1.
  • If the number of digits are same but the first digits are different, following procedure in example 2.

 

Example 2 – Write these numbers – 381, 945, 722, 106 in descending order. 

First method, compare the first digits and rearrange, starting from the highest number.

3 8 1

9 4 5

7 2 2

1 0 6

 

The descending order is 945, 722, 381 and 106.

 

EXERCISE

Write the following as indicated –

1. 929, 923, 452, 146 in ascending order.

2. 899, 393, 742, 716 in descending order

3. 792, 792, 745, 714 in ascending order.

 

 

LESSON 2 – ORDERING OF WHOLE NUMBERS UP TO 100 000

ACTIVITY 1 – INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITIES

Write the following in ascending or descending order – 566, 492, 109, 601, 457.

 

EXPECTED ANSWER 

566

492

109

601

457

 

The ascending order is 106, 457, 492, 566, 601

 

ACTIVITY 2 – ORDERING OF WHOLE NUMBERS UP TO 100 000

Guide pupils through the following examples.

 

Example 1 – Write in ascending order – 8 929, 4 923, 3 452, 8 146. 

 

1st – 8 929 = 8 000 + 900 + 20 + 9

2nd – 4 923 = 4 000 + 900 + 20 + 3

3rd – 3 452 = 3 000 + 400 + 50 + 2

4th – 8 146 = 8 000 + 100 + 40 + 6

 

The ascending order is 3 452, 4 923, 8 146 and 8 929.

 

Example 2 – Write in descending order – 812 929, 458 923, 312 452, 812 929, 458 923, 312 452, 898 146. 

 

8 1 2 9 2 9 2nd

4 5 8 9 2 3 3rd

3 1 2 4 5 2 4th

8 9 8 1 4 6 1st

 

The descending order is 812 929, 898 146 458 923 and 312 452. 

LESSON EVALUATION 

Write the following whole number –

1. 211 085, 213 936, 400 001, 899 477 in ascending order.

2. 211 477, 412 936, 400 378, 899 211 in descending order.

 

 

LESSON 3 – COMPARING WHOLE NUMBERS USING LESS THAT, GREATER THAN OR EQUAL TO SIGNS

ACTIVITY 1 – INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITIES 

Ask pupils mention the name of each of the following:

 

<

 

>

 

=

 

EXPECTED ANSWER, 

 

< – less than

> – greater than

= – equal to

 

ACTIVITY 2 – USING < > AND = TO COMPARE TWO OR MORE NUMBERS 

 

Example 1 – Compare these numbers – 605 and 439 using the symbols > or <

6 0 5

4 3 9

 

Compare the first digit from the left, 6 > 4 while 4 < 6.

Therefore, 605 > 439 while 439 < 605

 

Example 2 – Compare these numbers – 381 945 and 722 106 using > or <

 

381 945

722 106

 

Compare the first digits from left to the right. 3 < 7 while 7 > 3

Therefore, 381 945 < 722 106 while 722 106 > 381 945

 

LESSON EVALUATION 

Compare the following using the symbols > or <

 

1. 816 842 and 897 893

2. 208 115 and 280 511

3. 721 127 and 712 722

 

 

LESSON 4 – COMPARISON USING < > AND =

ACTIVITY 1 – INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITIES 

Add the following numbers,

1. 7 + 9

2. 10 + 5

3. Compare the results in question 1 and 2.

 

EXPECTED ANSWERS 

1. 7 + 9 = 16

2. 10 + 6 = 16

3. The answers are equal.

 

Teacher’s remark – The results in question 1 and 2 are the same and it can be written as –

7 + 9 = 10 + 6

 

ACTIVITY 1 

Using < > or = compare the following:

1. 12 + 7 and 7 + 5

2. 24 – 15 and 15 + 12

3. 4 x 5 and 5 x 4

 

SOLUTIONS 

1. 12 + 7 and 7 + 5

12 + 7 = 19 and 7 + 5 = 12

Therefore, 12 + 7 > 7 +5

 

2. 24 – 15 and 15 + 12

24 – 15 = 9 and 15 + 12 = 27

Therefore, 24 – 15 < 15 + 12

 

3. 4 x 5 and 5 x 4

4 x 5 = 20 and 5 x 4 = 20

Therefore, 4 x 5 = 5 x 4

 

LESSON EVALUATION 

Using <, > or = compare the following:

1. 18 ÷ 9 and 3 x 3

2. 5 + 6 and 22 – 11

3. 15 x 0 and 0 x 15

4. Number of boys and girls in the classroom.

 

LESSON 5 – REVISION EXERCISES AND WEEKLY ASSESSMENT

Answer all the questions.

1. Arrange 381, 945, 722, 106 in descending order.

 

2. Write 566, 492, 109, 601 in ascending order.

 

3. Which of these numbers – 816, 842, 897, 893 is the smallest and greatest numbers.

 

4. What is the 2nd and 3rd of these numbers 381, 945, 722, 106 in descending order.

 

5. Compare 381 945 and 722 106 using < and > in descending order.

 

6. Use < and > to compare 816 842 and 897 893 in ascending order.

 

Use <, > or = compare the following:

7. 18 ÷ 9 and 3 x 3

 

8. 5 + 6 and 22 – 11

 

9. 15 x 0 and 0 x 15

 

10. Number of chairs and tables in the classroom.

 

 

PRESENTATION

To deliver the lesson, the teacher adopts the following steps:

1. To introduce the lesson, the teacher revises the previous lesson. Based on this, he/she asks the pupils some questions;

2. Device a technique to help pupils to write whole number in ascending or descending order up to 100 000.

 

Pupil’s Activities – Follow the teacher’s techniques write whole number in ascending or descending order up to 100 000.

3. Asks pupils to write the symbols of the following – less than, greater than and equal to.

4. Asks pupils to use arm to demonstrate the symbol of less than, greater than and equal to.

Pupil’s Activities – Write the symbols of less than, greater than and equal to with arm demonstration.

5. Leads pupils to recall the meaning of the symbol <, > or =.

Pupil’s Activities – With examples, explain the meaning of <, > or =.

6. Gives more exercises on comparison and ordering of whole numbers.

7. Guides pupils to solve some quantitative aptitude problems involving ordering of whole numbers.

Pupil’s Activities – Attempt most of the exercises correctly.

 

 

CONCLUSION

To conclude the lesson for the week, the teacher revises the entire lesson and links it to the following week’s lesson.

 

 

NEXT LESSON

 

 

LESSON EVALUATION

Ask pupils to – 

1. order given whole numbers.

2. compare using <, > or =.

3. solve more problems on quantitative aptitude.

 

 

WORKBOOK

WEEKLY ASSESSMENT (TEST)

1. Arrange 381, 945, 722, 106 in descending order.

 

A. 722, 945, 381, 106

B. 381, 945, 722, 106

C. 945, 722, 381, 106

 

2. Write 566, 492, 109, 601 in ascending order.

A. 109, 556, 492, 601

B. 109, 491, 566, 601

C. 109, 491, 601, 566

 

3. Which of these numbers – 816, 842, 897, 893 is the smallest and greatest numbers.

A. 816 and 842

B. 816 and 897

C. 816 and 893

 

4. What is the 2nd and 3rd of these numbers 381, 945, 722, 106 in descending order.

A. 381 and 722

B. 381 and 945

C. 381 and 106

 

5. Compare 381 945 and 722 106 by using < or >.

A. 381 945 > 722 106 or 722 106 > 381 945

B. 381 945 < 722 106 or 722 106 > 381 945

C. 381 945 < 722 106 or 722 106 < 381 945

 

 

6. Use <, > or = to compare 816 842 and 897 893.

 

A. 816 842 > 897 893

B. 897 893 = 816 842

C. 816 842 < 897 893

 

Using <, > or = compare the following:

7. 18 ÷ 9 and 3 x 3

A. 18 ÷ 9 = 3 x 3

B. 18 ÷ 9 > 3 x 3

C. 18 ÷ 9 < 3 x 3

 

8. 5 + 6 and 22 – 11

A. 5 + 6 < 22 – 11

B. 5 + 6 > 22 – 11

C. 5 + 6 = 22 – 11

 

9. 15 x 0 and 0 x 15

A. 15 x 0 > 0 x 15

B. 15 x 0 < 0 x 15

C. 15 x 0 = 0 x 15

 

10. Number of chairs and tables in the classroom.

 

A. chairs = tables

B. chairs > tables

C. chairs < tables

 

Question 10 is the current number of chairs and tables in primary 4. 

 

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